East-Central Europe after the Cold War
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East-Central Europe after the Cold War Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary in search of security by Andrew Cottey

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Published by Macmillan in Basingstoke .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementAndrew Cottey.
The Physical Object
Pagination(272)p. :
Number of Pages272
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17346405M
ISBN 100333639294

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East-Central Europe After the Cold War: Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary in Search of Security Andrew Cottey This text is an examination of the evolution of the national security policies of the countries of East-Central Europe - Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary - since the East European revolutions of East-Central Europe after the Cold War: Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary in search of security / Andrew Cottey Macmillan Press ; St. Martin's Press Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire [England]: New York Australian/Harvard Citation. Cottey, Andrew. East-Central Europe after the Cold War Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary in Search of Security. Budapest The book is a detailed examination of the evolution of the national security policies of the countries of East-Central Europe - Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary - since the East European revolutions of After Stalin’s death, preserving the status quo remained a top priority for Moscow. Even though the incoming administration of Dwight D. Eisenhower launched a propaganda campaign for the “liberation of the captive nations,” the new Soviet leaders never contemplated the surrender of the East Central European Communist states.

Transitions of Eastern Europe after the Cold War. After World War II ended in , Europe was divided into Western Europe and Eastern Europe by the Iron Curtain The physical barrier in the form of walls, barbed wire, or land mines that divided Eastern Europe and Western Europe during the Cold n Europe fell under the influence of the Soviet Union, and the region was separated from. 4 Russia and East Central Europe after the Cold War: A Fundamentally Transformed Relationship / edited by Andrei Zagorski. Prague: Human Rights Publishers, P. Layout and design: DigiTisk Studio spol. s r.o., Prague. Challenging conventional wisdom about German dominance in the new Europe, this study presents a new approach to the question of power and influence after the Cold War. Inspired by the debate over German hegemony and drawing on intensive fieldwork, Ann L. Phillips develops two original cases of German relations with East-Central Europe to test competing arguments. Political Transition in East-Central Europe and the End of the Cold War, – Csaba Békés argues that the eventual Soviet acceptance of internal political changes in East-Central Europe in by no means meant that Gorbachev was ready to give up the Soviet sphere of influence in the region as well.

After World War II, 12 million Germans, 3 million Poles and Ukrainians, and tens of thousands of Hungarians were expelled from their homes and forced to migrate to their supposed countries of origin. This work gives an account of the turmoil caused by the migration during the nascent Cold War. CONTENTS. Introduction Mark Kramer. 1. Russia and East Central Europe after the Cold War: A Fundamentally Transformed Relationship / edited by Andrei Zagorski. Prague: Human Rights Publishers, P. Her current book project Economics of Hereness: The Polish Origins of Global Developmentalism revises the history of developmental thinking by centering east-central Europe as the locality of innovations in economic thought in post-imperial Europe and the postcolonial world. It investigates the role of Warsaw-based social scientists. Get this from a library! East-Central Europe after the Cold War: Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary in search of security. [Andrew Cottey] -- "Since the countries of East-Central Europe, Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary, have radically transformed their national security policies. East-Central Europe after the Cold War.