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The Irish Protestant Churches in the Twentieth Century by Alan Megahey

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Published by Palgrave Macmillan .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Christianity - Denominations,
  • General,
  • Religion / Christianity,
  • Christianity - Protestant,
  • Protestantism,
  • Politics / Current Events,
  • 20th century,
  • Church history,
  • History,
  • Ireland,
  • Northern Ireland,
  • Protestant churches,
  • Religion

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages251
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL9592173M
ISBN 100312236018
ISBN 109780312236014

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This book is unique in recording the history of all the Protestant churches in Ireland in the twentieth century, though with particular focus on the two largest - the Presbyterian and the Church of Ireland. It examines the changes and chances in Brand: Palgrave Macmillan UK. Protestantism is a Christian minority on the island of the census of Northern Ireland, 48% (,) described themselves as Protestant, which was a decline of approximately 5% from the census. In the census of the Republic of Ireland, % of the population described themselves as Protestant. In the Republic, Protestantism was the second largest . This book is unique in recording the history of all the Protestant churches in Ireland in the twentieth century, though with particular focus on the two largest - the Presbyterian and the Church of Ireland. Get this from a library! The Irish Protestant churches in the twentieth century. [Alan J Megahey] -- This book is unique in recording the history of all the Protestant churches in Ireland in the twentieth century, though with particular focus on the two largest - .

Hey, Thanks for the question, and it is a good one. My specialty is Irish Catholicism, specifically in the early twentieth century, but I've certainly studied the protestant experience as well (which is woefully underserved, in my opinion) so I'll try and answer your questions as best as I can. The Irish Protestant churches in the twentieth century (Basingstoke, ). Mitchel, P. Evangelicalism and national identity in Ulster – (Oxford, ). Moffitt, M. Soupers and jumpers: the Protestant missions in Connemara, – (Dublin, ). Protestant and Irish: The minority’s search for place in independent Ireland, Ian d’Alton and Ida Milne (eds), Cork University Press, pp, €39, ISBN We asked three historians to respond to the recent publication of Ian D’Alton and Ida Milne’s Protestant and was asked to write a short initial response to the book and then, each having read . Beginning with Catholic attitudes to the Act of Union this work traces various elements in the interrelationship between the Catholic Church and the state in Ireland in the 19th century. Catholicismâ??s role in the Protestant state for most of the century was tempered and conditioned by its relationship with the various Protestant churches in the country.4/5(1).

The Protestant churches in Ireland were unionist: they maintained that the century-old Act of Union between Britain and Ireland must remain on the statute book. The main churches had, as institutions, opposed Gladstone’s first and second home rule bills in and Author: Alan J Megahey. Beginning with Catholic attitudes to the Act of Union this work traces various elements in the interrelationship between the Catholic Church and the state in Ireland in the 19th century. Catholicism's role in the Protestant state for most of the century was tempered and conditioned by its relationship with the various Protestant churches in the Cited by: 2. Protestant Irish nationalists are adherents of Protestantism in Ireland who also support Irish nationalism. Protestants have played a large role in the development of Irish nationalism since the eighteenth century, despite most Irish nationalists historically being from the Irish Catholic majority, as well as most Irish Protestants usually tending toward unionism in Ireland. Miller has suggested that the propensity of Irish Presbyterian migrants to haggle over doctrine had an afterlife in America and provided the religious and cultural resources for the rise of Protestant fundamentalism in the twentieth century. 25 It is also clear from D. H. Akenson’s wonderful recent study that the intellectual roots of.